Balneus

Australian Lefty on Politics, Governance, Science and Info Management

The curious tale of Mr Rabbit and Mr Fox

Posted by Dave Bath on 2010-08-27


Mr Rabbit and Mr Fox have joined forces and strategies, brazenly hiding the truth, scared enough to risk exposing their illegitamacy to be considered as, respectively, a government and a news outlet.

Mr Rabbit is trying to be a cunning fox who is Professor of Cunning at Oxford, as Blackadder would say.

Mr Fox is running like a scared rabbit, afraid of democracy, perhaps.

Even in the Murdoch broadsheet, the actions and reactions of key players affecting the decisions about who will be PM, are unreported, or buried.

The ALP might need to show grace to uniformed members of the Liberal Party, but can, and should, attack the "unlawful combatant", the Murdoch press, particularly "The Australian", making broadsheet readers search for halfway reliable news elsewhere, and making advertisers follow them.

Any person with knowledge of the raw unspun news, merely who said what and who did what, must wonder what both Mr Rabbit and Mr Fox have to hide, as the obfuscators must think the considerable potential damage from hiding facts is much less than the damage from their exposure.

If the Rabbit/Fox push for another election succeeds, the Fox’s brazen unwillingness to give readers the most newsworthy information of the week can itself become a newsitem, raised repeatedly by progressive forces until it cuts through to the general public, and that public understands Rabbit’s inability to "show good faith" to anybody, including the electorate.

Why would Mr Fox so put at risk the opinion of his broadsheet, risk its readers moving en masse to either Age, SMH or AFR?

My guess is that Mr Fox sees the greatest threat being the agenda of the rural independents.

The question is, which part of that agenda scares Mr Fox the most?

Better parliamentary procedures and debate should not be a threat to a news organization, but it could be for Murdoch.

Truth-in-political-advertising and limits to political donations demanded by the independents is perhaps a bigger threat: lowered spends on misleading scare campaigns, even bigger cuts in political funds available for advertising in general, would hurt Mr Fox’s profits, especially if those constraints were picked up in the various states and territories: elections are like Xmas bonuses for commercial media.

News Ltd could, by not reporting the news, might become newsworthy itself, and the source of news for far fewer broadsheet readers." (A bit more cleavage on page 3 and more sport is all that is needed to defend Mr Fox’s tabloids.)

The sooner the ALP attacks Mr Fox, the less likely Mr Rabbit is to succeed.

The sooner, and louder, the independents attack Mr Fox, the greater the chance they’ll not only improve our democracy by better parliamentary process, but by a better-informed public.


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One Response to “The curious tale of Mr Rabbit and Mr Fox”

  1. joey said

    Any person with knowledge of the raw unspun news, merely who said what and who did what, must wonder what both Mr Rabbit and Mr Fox have to hide, as the obfuscators must think the considerable potential damage from hiding facts is much less than the damage from their exposure.

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